6 GREAT HEALTH AND WELLNESS TIPS FROM 6 GREAT NCAA COACHES

6 GREAT HEALTH AND WELLNESS TIPS FROM 6 GREAT NCAA COACHES

Six teacher trainers left a lasting impression during my studies at Indiana University (IU) in Bloomington (graduated in 1979). I participated in classes that each of them taught, and I watched and learned from them as a trainer. The only way to describe these people is to be the best of the best.

Here are his short biographies and his six inspired health and wellness tips and a short story about each person:

1. James “Doc” Counsilman: Swimming has won six consecutive NCAA Division 1 title. Olympic coaches 1964 (Tokyo) and 1976 (Montreal), Mark Spitz coach at IU, and Olympic Games (seven gold medals). Doc was the first to use underwater videos to improve the technique of a swimmer. Doc swam in the Channel at the age of 58. He studied from 1957 to 1990 at the IU.

Tip – Visualize. I often feel that general advice like “more aerodynamics in the water” combines all the right techniques without the swimmer having to think about every attitude. Give people a vision, and it will be easier for them to integrate all the skills needed to realize that vision.

Story: Regarding relationships with sports parents, Doc once said, “The best coach job in the US would be an orphanage.” There was also a time when coach Knight (basketball) asked  Knight told Doc that the boy’s vertical jump was about an inch high. Doc says that Knight complained when he stopped helping the basketball player that the boy’s vertical jump was only 3 inches tall. Doc noted, however, that it was an improvement of 300%!

2. Sam Bell: Athletics, 1976 Olympic co-trainer (Tokyo). He trained 90 All-Americans Hoosier, seven of whom were Olympians. IU was founded from 1970 to 1998.

Tip: Get ready and work together. Continue your strength training, always use dynamic stretching before strenuous exercise, gradually cool off, change the pace, and compare. It’s good to expect significant improvements at all levels. Make it easy for people; keep them interesting, and make everyone move together.

Story: Jim Spivey was a four-minute runner in the IU with Coach Bell. From the ground, a run of fewer than four minutes seems to be the maximum speed of an average person but is maintained over the entire kilometer. I remember thinking that athletes looked like human muscle cars.

3. Jerry Yeagley: Football, He won six NCAA Division 1 title from 1973 (when football became college football) until 2003. The most successful coach of all-time in college football with 544 victories.

Tip: Attack and defend as a team. Do not focus too much on calories, health risks, biometrics, and calorie intake. Instead, think of more comprehensive strategies. Use your assets and use your playground (community) to the fullest. Think about how to ensure best that everyone plays a role in building a healthy culture.

History: Coach Yeagley can be one of the best coaches of all sports. We share a locker room with your team. But I remembered him that you would think he was the kind of towel if you did not know him. He gave an example, and the players worshiped him. The last thing that IU soccer players would do was disappoint their coach.

4. Bob Knight: Basketball, Won three titles in Division I of the NCAA 1. 1984 Olympic Coach (Los Angeles). He has won 902 games in the NCAA, the third-best ever in college basketball. Created in the user interface from 1971 to 2000.

Tip: Be realistic. Stop being Mr. or Mrs. Sunshine. Wake up and prepare for any problems.  Get your @ #% * and join us. Be ready to overcome any obstacles to success that you can imagine. Use a disciplined and moving strategy that keeps everyone in the game, regardless of possible setbacks. Prepare for improvisation.

Story: Coach Knight has often criticized questions from the press. Maybe you heard that too because I often told reporters, “This is the stupidest question I’ve ever heard, the next question!” Coach Knight spoke a colorful language, but most of the time, his communication was clear.

6 GREAT HEALTH AND WELLNESS TIPS FROM 6 GREAT NCAA COACHES

Story: Coach Knight has often criticized questions from the press. Maybe you heard that too because I often told reporters, “This is the stupidest question I’ve ever heard, the next question!” Coach Knight spoke a colorful language, but most of the time, his communication was clear.

5. Doug (Blu) Blubaugh: In wrestling, Doug (himself) was a Division 1 NCAA (1957) champion, 1960 Olympic champion (Rome), and the world’s most valuable fighter this year. There. He was the most massive person I knew (I fought for him at the IU, then I was his assistant coach, 1980-1982). He was considered one of the best wrestling clinicians in sports. He was educated at IU from 1972 to 1984.

Tip: Stay close. A fighter with internal control and pressure does not have to move much to invade. Get your basics, continue the attack, and then use your resources effectively. Often, small things can make the difference between points and non-points. Staying close to the action makes you look agile and agile, but you’re close to it at the right time.

Story: Coach Blubaugh was a farmer from Oklahoma. At one time, when he was in his best physical moment, he went to the field to fetch a horse. The horse would walk about 50 meters and would not be caught by Blu. Then Blu decided to run after this horse until the horse surrendered. This race lasted 13 hours. After that, the horse never fled. Anyone who knows Blu knows that it is a true story.

6. Lee Corso: Football, you can meet him as a popular host of the ESPN College GameDay program. He is the guy who puts the head of the school mascot, after which he will win the football game. He led IU to victory in the Holiday Bowl (1979). He is perhaps one of the funniest men I’ve ever met. He was educated in IU from 1973 to 1982.

Tip: Respect the media. The media are the most powerful organization on the planet. Learn to tell a story, participate with humor, maximize social media, and realize that communication is your most valuable asset.

Story: Laughing is what coach Corso is following. It’s fun to be close. Everyone is happy to be with you. It’s not just fun, and it’s smart too. We all learned a lot from him and did not find work for a minute.Trainers want people to achieve the highest levels of human physical performance. They criticize weaknesses, encourage forces, always demand improvements, and expect a lot from their athletes. We draw the lessons of the best coaches for our daily lives. I hope you find a gold nugget in the six tips that inspired me for your program.

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