Removal of a wisdom tooth | And seek dental care,

Removal of a wisdom tooth | And seek dental care,

Surgery Overview

An oral and maxillofacial surgeon or a dentist can remove a wisdom tooth. The procedure can often be done in the dentist’s or surgeon’s office. You may have surgery in the hospital, especially if you are going to get all the wisdom teeth removed at the same time or if you are at high risk for complications.

If you have any infection, surgery will usually be delayed until the infection is gone. Your doctor or dentist may tell you to take antibiotics to help cure the disease.

Before removing a wisdom tooth, the dentist will administer a local anesthetic to numb the area from which the tooth will be extracted. General anesthesia can be used, mainly if several or all wisdom teeth are to be removed at the same time. General anesthesia prevents pain throughout the body and will make you sleep during the procedure. The dentist will probably recommend that you do not eat or drink anything after midnight the night before the process so that you are prepared for anesthesia.

To remove the wisdom tooth, the dentist will open the gum tissue over the tooth and remove any bone that is covering the tooth. He or she will separate the tissue that connects the tooth with the bone and then remove the tooth.

After the tooth has been removed, you may need stitches. Some points dissolve over time, and others have to be removed after a few days. Your dentist will tell you if it is necessary to remove the stitches. A folded cotton gauze will be placed over the wound to help stop bleeding.

What to expect after surgery

In most cases, the recovery time is only a few days. Take pain relievers (pain medications) as prescribed by the dentist or oral surgeon.

  • Lightly bite the gauze periodically, and change the bandage as it is soaked with blood. Call your dentist or oral surgeon if you are still bleeding 24 hours after surgery.
  • While the mouth is numb, be careful not to bite the inside of the cheek or lip or tongue.
  • Do not lie down horizontally. This can prolong bleeding. Raise your head with pillows.
  • Try using an ice pack on the outside of the cheek. Apply it for 15-20 minutes each time for the first 24 hours. You can use moist heat, such as a cloth soaked in warm, drained water, for the next 2 or 3 days.
  • Relax after surgery. Physical activity can increase bleeding.
  • Eat soft foods, such as jello, pudding or watery soup. 
  • Do not use a straw (straw) for the first few days. Sipping through a straw can loosen the blood clot and delay healing.
  • After the first day, You can prepare your saltwater by mixing one teaspoon ( 5 g ) of salt in a medium-sized glass [ 8 fluid ounces (240 mL) ] of warm water. Do not rinse thoroughly. This can release the clot and delay healing.
  •  The suction movement can loosen the clot and delay healing. Also, smoking decreases the blood supply and can carry microbes and contaminants to the area of ​​surgery.
  • Continue brushing your teeth and tongue carefully.

The dentist will remove the stitches after a few days, if necessary

Why is it done

The wisdom tooth is extracted to correct a current problem or to prevent issues that may arise in the future. These are some of the issues that can occur when wisdom teeth begin to come out:

  • Your jaw may not be large enough for them so that they can be retained and unable to exit through the gums.
  • Wisdom teeth may only partially exit through the gums, which causes a gum tissue flap to grow on them. Food and microbes can get trapped under the flap and cause the gums to become red, swollen and sore. These are signs of infection.
  • More severe problems may occur because of retained teeth, such as infection, damage to other teeth or bone, or a cyst.
  • One or more wisdom teeth can begin to come out at an awkward angle, with the top of the tooth facing forward, backward or to either side.

Effectiveness

The removal of wisdom teeth is usually sufficient to avoid the following:

  • The crowding of the posterior teeth.
  • A wisdom tooth that is stuck in the jaw (retained) and never leaves through the gums.
  • Gums reddened, swollen and sore from a skin flap around a wisdom tooth that has only partially come out.
  • Gum disease and tooth decay in the wisdom tooth, which may be more challenging to clean than other teeth, or in the teeth and jaw in the wisdom tooth area.

Risks

Once the wisdom tooth is removed, you can have:

  • Pain and swelling in the gums and cavity (socket) at the place where the tooth was removed.
  • Bleeding that will not stop for approximately 24 hours.
  • Difficulty opening the mouth or pain when doing so ( trismus )
  • Slow healing of the gums.
  • Damage to existing dental work, such as crowns or bridges, or the roots of a nearby tooth.
  • A painful inflammation called dry socket, which occurs when the protective blood clot is lost too soon.
  • Numbness in the mouth and lips once local anaesthesia ceases to affect, due to injury or inflammation in the nerves of the jaw.
  • Uncommon side effects, including:
  • An opening in the sinus cavity if a wisdom tooth is removed from the upper jaw.

Dental surgery can cause bacteria that are present in the mouth to enter the bloodstream and cause infections in other parts of the body. People who have difficulty fighting infections may need antibiotics before and after dental surgery. These people include those who have artificial heart valves or who were born with heart abnormalities. The 5 best mouthwash in 2020

Anaesthesia (local and general) is almost always used during an extraction procedure. All surgeries, including oral surgery that uses general anaesthesia, carry a small risk of death or other complications.

To think.

If the wisdom teeth are not causing you problems, it may be challenging to decide whether to remove them to prevent possible dental problems in the future. Think of the following:

  • You may never have problems with wisdom teeth.
  • Removing wisdom teeth is rarely harmful to your health, but there are slight risks involved with any surgery.
  • In young people (last years of adolescence or before age 25) the roots of the wisdom tooth have not fully developed, and the jaw bone is not so dense, so it is easier to remove the tooth. The easier it is to extract the tooth, the more likely it is that its recovery will be unaffected.
  • Most problems with wisdom teeth occur between 15 and 25 years.
  • If you are over 30 years old, you only run a small risk of having problems with wisdom teeth. Few people over 30 years early have issues that require the removal of wisdom teeth.
  • Medical insurance does not always cover this procedure.
  • If you have another medical condition that may get worse over time and your teeth can cause problems, consider removing your wisdom teeth while you are healthy.

Women who take birth control pills and decide to remove the wisdom teeth should try to schedule the surgery towards the end of their menstrual cycle (usually between days 23 and 28). There seems to be a lower risk of dry socket during this time.

Once the wisdom tooth is removed, you may have or notice:

  • Pain and swelling in the gums and cavity (socket) at the place where the tooth was removed.
  • Bleeding that will not stop for approximately 24 hours.
  • Difficulty opening the mouth or pain when doing so (trismus).
  • Slow healing of the gums.
  • Damage to existing dental work, such as crowns or bridges, or the roots of a nearby tooth.
  • A painful inflammation called a dry socket.
  • Numbness in the mouth and lips once local anaesthesia ceases to affect, due to injury or inflammation in the nerves of the jaw. The numbness will usually disappear, but in rare cases, it can be permanent.

Dental surgery can cause bacteria that are present in the mouth to enter the bloodstream and cause infections in other parts of the body. People who have difficulty fighting infections may need antibiotics before and after dental surgery. These people include those who have artificial heart valves or who were born with heart abnormalities.

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